Country Update: Kazakhstan

kazakhstan

 

Kazakhstan is currently CLOSED to intercountry adoptions.

 

CCAI GENERAL OVERVIEW OF KAZAKHSTAN ADOPTION

Kazakhstan was the second largest republic in size of the former Soviet Union. When the breakup of the Soviet Union occurred in 1991, the economy of Kazakhstan plummeted. The economic decline led to an increase in the number of orphaned and abandoned children. Adopting from Kazakhstan became increasingly popular, and in 2005 Kazakhstan was number six on the sending countries list. During this time, intercountry adoptions were governed by the Constitution of Kazakhstan, the Convention on Children’s Rights, the Marriage and Family Law of Kazakhstan, and other laws and regulations. These laws did not recognize adoption agencies, but allowed prospective adoptive parents to work with such agencies for assistance in the adoption process with the government’s adoption authority – the Ministry of Education, Committee on Guardianship and Care.

 

Kazakhstan is not yet a member of the Hague Convention. In 2008, the government began to seriously limit the processing of new adoptions as it began the long process of reviewing the system that was in place for intercountry adoptions. In May of 2010, Kazakhstan announced that it was placing a moratorium on any new adoptions as the country prepares to join the Hague Convention and implement a Hague compliant system for intercountry adoptions. Kazakhstan expects to have this system in place by September of 2010. According to officials, this moratorium will not affect those adoptions already in the process of completion.

 

The above information was gathered from:
http://www.adoption.state.gov/country/kazakhstan.html

http://www.jcics.org/Kazakhstan.htm

http://www.theadoptionguide.com/options/adoption-from-kazakhstan.php

Flag: http://www.worldatlas.com/webimage/flags/countrys/mideast/kazakstn.htm

 

 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE ALERTS & NOTICES

February 7, 2014 Notice: Kazakhstan requires post-adoption reports

August 21, 2012 - Alert: Kazakhstan Suspends Intercountry Adoptions

May 10, 2012 - Adoption Notice: Adoptions from Kazakhstan to Begin With Approval of U.S. ASPs

April 5, 2012 - Adoption Notice: Kazakhstan Approval of New Hague Convention Adoption Process

January 13, 2011 - Adoption Notice: New Family & Marriage Code Signed Into Law

January 13, 2011 - Adoption Alert: Update Ministry of Education Plans to Match Families With Pending Adoption Dossiers

November 24, 2010 - Adoption Alert: Ministry of Education Plans to Match Families With Pending Adoption Dossiers
November 1, 2010 - Adoption Alert: Expedited Passport Services for Adopted Children

June 29, 2010 - Adoption Alert: Kazakhstani Government not Processing any new "Non-Hague" or Form I-600 cases

 

 

KAZAKHSTAN ADOPTION INFORMATION

All of the information listed below is from the following source:
Kazakhstan Web Page, U.S. Department of State, Office of Children's Issues


Number of Adoptions to the U.S.

Fiscal Year Number
FY 2013 0
FY 2012 0
FY 2011 86
FY 2010 181
FY 2009 295
FY 2008 379
FY 2007 547
FY 2006 588
FY 2005 755
FY 2004 835

Hague Country: Yes


Adoption Authority: The Ministry of Education and Science

 

SPECIAL RULES/PROCEDURES

In addition to the U.S. requirements for adoptive parents, Kazakhstan also has the following requirements for adoptive parents:

Residency Requirements: The prospective adoptive parents must reside with the child at the child’s habitual residence for a minimum of 14 days prior to the adoption. This pre-adoption bonding period cannot be waived.

Age Requirements: There are no age requirements other than an unmarried prospective adoptive parent must be at least 16 years older than the child. Prospective adoptive parents over 60 years of age have found it difficult to adopt.

Marriage Requirements: Prospective adoptive parents can be single or married, however, some unmarried prospective parents have found it difficult to adopt.

Income Requirements: While there are no official income requirements, the prospective adoptive parents are required to show proof of their ability to support the adopted child.